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On July 26, the 31st anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), President Biden announced in a Rose Garden briefing that persons experiencing long-term COVID-19 symptoms may qualify as persons with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and other federal statutes that protect persons with disabilities, such as Section
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From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of July 19, 2021. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue,
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From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of July 12, 2021. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue,
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Issuing the California Supreme Court’s decision in a much anticipated case, Justice Liu on behalf of a unanimous court explained in Ferra v. Loews Hollywood Hotel, LLC that “[t]he calculation of premium pay for a noncompliant meal, rest, or recovery period, like the calculation of overtime pay, must account for not only hourly wages but
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Some noteworthy labor and employment developments from the past week, in no particular order: Court rules against Christian teacher who wouldn’t use kids’ names, preferred pronouns. A federal judge in Indiana ruled against a high school orchestra teacher who refused, for religious reasons, to address his students by their preferred pronouns or use their chosen
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From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of July 5, 2021. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue,
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Well, not the whole Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Just the chair, Charlotte Burrows (D), who has issued non-binding guidance on sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination. (Reportedly, all three Republican members of the Commission — a majority* — have criticized the guidance.) *The EEOC will have a 3-2 Republican majority until July 2022, when the
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After a brief hiatus, Constangy’s Work & Play podcast is back. Our new host, Bill McMahon, talks with Piyumi Samaratunga about immigration law and what Constangy’s team of immigration lawyers can do for employers seeking to cast a wide net for talent. (Piyumi ought to know. She’s the co-chair of our Immigration Practice Group.) This
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From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of June 28, 2021. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue,
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We recently got our first federal court decision addressing whether an employer had the right to require employees to be vaccinated for COVID-19. The court’s answer was yes. The Houston Methodist Hospital System issued a directive in March requiring that all executives, managers, and new hires be fully vaccinated by a deadline. Everyone complied. Then,
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Lovely people, the HMRC – completely above criticism in all respects, I have always thought. Just wanted to put that out there in a way obviously wholly unrelated to this week’s news that the Revenue has launched over 12,800 “probes” into misuses of Coronavirus support schemes. The majority of these relate to the CJRS furlough
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Late last year, we reported that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) had released a proposed rule modifying the mandatory conciliation process the EEOC must follow before it can file a lawsuit in its own name against an employer. Under long-standing anti-discrimination statutes, before the EEOC can commence litigation against an employer for employment discrimination
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