Work

Ten years ago or so, every employment lawyer and his sister was calling the interaction between workers’ compensation, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act “the Bermuda Triangle.” The idea was that trying to keep all of these laws in mind while dealing with injured employees caused employers to become
0 Comments
In line with the impending movement back to the physical workplace comes some updated Acas guidance around consultation with your workforce about preventing the Coronavirus in the process. The line between communication and consultation in the guidance is not always clearly marked, but that should not be an issue in view of Acas’s injunction that
0 Comments
From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of March 29. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue,
0 Comments
Although the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a feeling of “impending doom” about COVID-19, many employers are ready to get back to normal. And for many employers, that means ordering telecommuting employees back to the office. The real office. As in, the building. None of this “virtual” malarkey. “Back to
0 Comments
From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of March 22. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this issue, we
0 Comments
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has announced that it will collect employers’ EEO-1 Component 1 data for 2019 and 2020 starting April 26 and running through July 19. The EEOC stopped collecting Component 1 data for 2019 last spring because of the COVID pandemic. That’s why it will be collecting two years’ worth of
0 Comments
The American Rescue Plan Act has made some important changes to the obligations of employer-sponsored health plans under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, better known as COBRA. If an individual became or becomes eligible for COBRA because of an involuntary change in status, and if the individual has any eligibility left between April 1
0 Comments
Wednesday was Equal Pay Day, the day on which women’s pay finally catches up to that of their male counterparts. They say that a woman has to work from January 1 through March 24, 2021, in addition to all of calendar year 2020, to make as much money as a guy who worked only in
0 Comments
On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the “Rescue Plan”).[1] This post reviews Section 9641 of the Rescue Plan, which makes available tax credits to certain employers who voluntarily provide paid time sick leave and family and medical act leave to employees for absences occasioned by the
0 Comments
From our Capital Thinking blog, our public policy colleague Stacy Swanson shares the latest federal employment law developments in in the legislative and executive branches during the week of March 15. *** This is a weekly post spotlighting labor topics in focus by the US legislative and executive branches during the previous week. In this
0 Comments
Yesterday the U.S. Senate voted 68-29 to confirm (former) Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to be Secretary of Labor. Last night, Mr. Walsh resigned as Mayor of Boston. The Secretary of Labor oversees a number of federal agencies, including the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the Wage and
0 Comments